What’s So Special About Chollah?

Today, I thought I’d share an article which inspired me greatly. One of the positive aspects of social media is the fact that websites such as Facebook and Twitter- despite their tendency to waste a large chunk of productive time- is that they constantly offer articles and insights which I wouldn’t otherwise see. So when Chabad.org posted this article about Chollah, I just had to check it out.

Recently, I’ve been struggling with Shabbes. There have been quite a few weeks when I’ve spent Shabbes feeling lonely, uninspired, and generally cut off from the world around me. I’m not proud of this. Shabbes is a day when I’m supposed to truly connect with both Hashem and the Jewish community, and I’m aware that it should be the most joyous and spiritual day of the week. I’ve been wondering how on earth to get over this stumbling block, and then the Chollah article gave me an idea.

A while back, a rabbi told me that making Shabbes is supposed to be a segula for parnossoh. This sounds counter-intuitive, but perhaps, if one manages to have an especially restful and beautiful Shabbes, they will be more productive during the rest of the week. And so, when I read this article today, I took it as a sign. Maybe Hashem is telling me to start making Shabbes at home, with all the traditional foods and fineries. Maybe, making Chollah isn’t something that ‘other women do’.

Maybe this is the answer I’ve been looking for.

http://www.chabad.org/theJewishWoman/article_cdo/aid/3865369/jewish/11-Challah-Facts-Every-Jewish-Woman-Should-Know.htm

7 thoughts on “What’s So Special About Chollah?

  1. obviously i cant keep you company on shabbes unless we get a very long hose in between my place and yours. you put the hose to your ear and i talk into it, and then i put the hose to my ear and you talk. email is obviously right out. if you got a very high powered telescope its possible that smoke signals would work, but i dont know if thats kosher even if the fire is made earlier. also around here, theres way too many codes for that to happen.

    one-way communication is more practical. if you left the computer on, and disabled the feature that turns your screen off after a few minutes, you could go to a chat room on mibbit where someone could type to you in realtime. but once text scrolled to the top of the screen, you couldnt read it until shabbes was over.

    chollah is one of the most delicious kinds of bread there is. i would say: chollah, croissants, and i used to know a swiss baker that made chollah that made a similar braided bread he called “bernian plate.” it was slightly more delicious than chollah, i dont know if the recipe is kosher or not (probably, but theres a lot that goes into something being kosher.)

    Liked by 1 person

      1. i thought so probably, but (as evidenced in the other comment) im never entirely sure. ive done kosher cooking (baking) before, but that started with a recipe i knew was kosher. also im not sure if there arent other reasons it wouldnt work as chollah for shabbes. sometimes kosher is about whats in the food, other times it about making certain every step is included.

        i dont even know what the ingredients for bernian plate are, but i also dont know if that kind of bread is missing a thing that makes it suitable. i am very glad that the idea is plausible, because ive had very few breads that are as delicious as chollah let alone more delicious– and this bread even looks like it and is baked by someone that makes chollah as well. though i doubt his chollah was made in a kosher bakery, this was nearly a decade and a half ago besides.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. if i were keeping you company on passover, id make you some matzoh ball soup before shabbes, and i would roll the matzoh into little snakes and braid them into little matzoh chollah, just to make you laugh. im sure it would take a few tries before i managed to braid matzoh– but its probably still easier than breaking it along the perforations 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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